Automatic Categorisation

By Glenda: First published in Online Currents – Vol.18 Issues 1, 2 and 3, Jan-Apr 2003

1. Principles of Classification

Automatic categorisation is the new ‘killer app’ for information access on Web sites, intranets and portals. However, is it really the solution to information overload, or is it just another promised technological fix that doesn’t deliver? This three-part article examines the state of the art in automatic categorisation. This part examines research in classification theory and its relevance to automatic categorisation. The second looks at some of the principles and practices in automatic categorisation, while the third focuses on specific software products. read more

Automatic Indexing

  • Database indexing
  • Retrieval and ranking tools
  • Document abstracting
  • Book indexing
  • Indexicon
  • Effect of automatic methods on professionals
  • References

Introduction

This paper will examine developments in automatic indexing and abstracting in which the computer creates the index and abstract, with little or no human intervention. The emphasis is on practical applications, rather than theoretical studies. This paper does not cover computer-aided indexing, in which computers enhance the work of human indexers, or indexing of the Internet.

Research into automatic indexing and abstracting has been progressing since the late 1950’s. Early reports claimed success, but practical applications have been limited. Computer indexing and abstracting are now being used commercially, with prospects for further use in the future. The history of automatic indexing and abstracting is well covered by Lancaster (1991). read more

Classification versus specific entry in book indexes (PDF)

Classification versus specific entry in book indexes (PDF)

Abstract: The author, a long-standing indexer and teacher of indexing, notes that specific indexing is nowadays generally considered to be the best approach for book indexes, but goes on to look at why specific indexing can cause problems to indexer and user alike, and to examine whether a classified approach still has something to offer.

First published in The Indexer v.28 n.1 March 2010

Commissioning an index

We have been involved in book indexing for over twenty years. We are primarily back-of-book indexers, but have also worked on journal, database, website and online help indexing, as well as metadata and thesaurus construction for intranets and websites. Glenda has a background in research, librarianship and TAFE teaching, while Jon is involved in PC training, programming and the production of computer-based training materials.

How much do we charge?

Before beginning an index we will need to arrange an agreed-upon quote, based on as much information as you can give us about the type and size of the book, and the depth of indexing you require. Until we have seen page proofs we can only give an estimate of the cost of an indexing job. read more

Copyright in the Digital Age

By Glenda: First published in Online Currents – 20 (9) November 2005

To examine the risks and opportunities presented by digital information, earlier this year Copyright Agency Limited (CAL) held a half-day seminar entitled ‘Copyright in the Digital Age: Learn How to Protect Your Work in the Digital Environment’.  The sessions were presented by CAL staff members, Michael Fraser, Caroline Morgan, and Eric Moore.  These sessions were followed by a panel discussion featuring representatives from the publishing industry, authors, board members of CAL, and representatives from the Australian Society of Authors.  This paper is drawn from the presentations and panel discussion of the CAL seminar (http://www.copyright.com.au/seminar_papers_CDA.htm ) and on information sheets available on the CAL site (http://www.copyright.com.au/information.htm ), as well as other cited references. read more

Digital futures: working together for our readers. June/July 2015 INCITE, p. 25

Digital futures: working together for our readers

The theme for this issue of INCITE was reducing burnout as we cope with digital publishing. One of my responses was that cooperation is good for all of us, including our readers. Another was that the field is constantly changing, so making decisions based on the ebooks and readers of today is not enough. Indexes are one example of ebook features that will be changing.

Published in INCITE (June-July 2015, p25) – the magazine of the Australian Library and Information Association. It presents perspectives on issues relating to library and information science. read more